The Intentional Traveler’s Guide To Cruising

Featuring

•Cruise Tips •Itineraries •Ports of Call

At anchor Bora Bora

We love cruising…

we’d love to share our experiences with you in this guide to cruising. We enjoy the entertainment and the food and there always seems like there is something to do. It also gives us an opportunity to do nothing – we read and relax by the pool and just watch the ocean roll by. It takes us through a world of interesting places. We get to meet lots of people from all over along with friends that share our interests. We like it so much we have taken over fifty cruises – including a number of long cruises.

Scroll down for the cruising table of contents.

Sint Maarten

We think we’ve learned a few things over the years and we’d like to share our tips, itineraries, and destinations, so take a look through the currently eight dozen articles listed below…

A few things we’ve learned over the past twenty years. Ideas for saving money when booking a cruise, making us of loyalty programs and more. If you are new to cruising and are ready to book a cruise we got some advice that could help…

Cruise Tips

Cell Phones And Cruising                 Duty Free Spirits

Saving On A Cruise                            Cruise Land Tours

Cruising And The Jones Act              Mobile Passport App

Cruising Loyalty Programs

Icy Straight Point, Alaska

The age of the old ocean liners was marked by trans-Atlantics, Mediterranean  and round the world cruises and were mainly for the very wealthy. Some twenty to thirty years ago cruising came into a new age as first-time cruisers selected the Caribbean, Hawaii and Alaska for their cruising vacations. As those cruisers returned, the industry enticed new customers with bigger and grander ships. Now to keep everyone coming back the industry is looking for new destinations. Australia, the South China Sea, South America and Antarctica to name a few.Every cruise port is different. Some see a virtual parade of cruise ships each week and some rarely have one visit. Being informed about facilities and what’s near the port before you arrive can help you make a plan on how best to get around, what attractions to see and what to expect when disembarking. For warned is forearmed.

Celebrity docked St. Kitts

Cruise Itineraries

The Panama Canal                           Alaska Glaciers

Cruising Alaska                                The South China Sea

Repositioning Cruises                    Cruising The West Coast

New England Fall Cruises              Mediterranean Cruises

River Cruising Europe Pt 1      &       Pt 2

Caribbean Cruises Part 1     Part 2    &     Part 3

Cruise Ports of Call

 

The Panama Canal

We’ve visited over a hundred cruise ports of call. Here we offer our impressions and what we’ve learned about each. So far there are around fifty port articles and we are adding more as fast as we can. Please check back often or better yet become a subscriber and get a notice about each new article.

Sydney

Every cruise port is different. Some see a virtual parade of cruise ships each week and some rarely have one visit. Being informed about facilities and what’s near the port before you arrive can help you make a plan on how best to get around. As you explore your itinerary choices, check here to learn what to expect in those ports of call. Do you tender or dock, are there terminals or is it a working port? How far to town from the cruise dock? What does the port have to offer.

EUROPE

Athens, Greece (Piraeus)                Barcelona, Spain

Cobh, Ireland                                       Dublin, Ireland

Dunmore East, Ireland                      Lerwick, Shetlands

Livorno, Italy                                        Naples, Italy

Palma de Mallorca                               Reykjavik, Iceland

Rome (Civitavecchia), Italy               Santorini, Greece

Port of Venice, Italy                              Villefranche-sur-Mer, France

RIVER CRUISING

River Cruising in Europe Part 1            Part 2

THE US & NORTH AMERICA

Cabo Mexico                                         Cozumel Mexico

Florida Cruise Ports                           Honolulu Hawaii

Icy Straight Point, Alaska                   Juneau Alaska

Key West Port of Call                            Kona, Hawaii

New Orleans                                            Quebec City, Canada

Vancouver, Canada                                Skagway Aaska

Victoria, BC Canada

CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA

Porto Madryn, Argentina                  Buenos Aries      

Montevideo, Uruguay                         Roatan Honduras

Stanley, The Falkland Islands           Ushuaia, Argentina

CARIBBEAN

Antigua W.I.                    Barbados

Curacao                            Grand Cayman

Grand Turk                      Nassau, Bahamas

St. Croix USVI                  Sint Maarten

Grenada                            St. Thomas USVI

Roatan Honduras

The lawn, Celebrity Eclipse

ISLANDS NEAR & FAR

Kings Wharf Bermuda                      Azores

Lerwick, Shetlands                             Reykjavik, Iceland

Stanley, The Falkland Islands          Tahiti

Tenerife, Canary Islands

Royal Caribbean Akaroa, New Zealand

ASIA & DOWN UNDER

Akaroa, New Zealand                        Auckland, N. Z.

Bangkok, Laem Chabang                   Brunei

Saigon, Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh)         Manila

Sydney, Australia                                  Singapore

Nha Trang, Vietnam

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Port of Call Tenerife

Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands

West of southern Morocco in the Atlantic Ocean sits a cluster of volcanic islands called The Canaries. The Canary Islands feature a rugged volcanic landscape known for the black and white sand beaches. Tenerife, the largest island, is dominated by an active volcano Mt. Teide, which has its own astronomical observatory and is part of Teide National Park. Tenerife hosts a huge pre-Lent Carnival each year in the capital of Santa Cruz de Tenerife.

Santa Cruz de Tenerife

Where Your Ship Docks

Most cruise ships will dock at the piers in Santa Cruz de Tenerife. There are no cruise terminals or readily available public facilities at the pier. While docked in the city it is still a good walk to reach the central business district. At times there can be shuttles available to get out of the port area.

Transportation

The island does have a good bus system (CLICK HERE) that uses a pass card, the Ten+ Travel Card. It can be used on most all bus routes. The plastic card itself can be purchased at various outlets around the island for €2 plus a €5 minimum charge amount amount. The island of Tenerife is a large covering almost 100 square miles with a trip from one end to the other being about fifty miles.

Because of the distances that you need to cover to see the island on a short visit it’s recommended that you rent a car or take a tour.

Currency

The Canary Islands, like Spain are part of the EU making the local currency the Euro. Credit cards are widely accepted but you will need to use the Euro for cash transactions.

Attractions

The Canary Islands are a favorite holiday destination for Europeans, particularly the British. It features a good selection of fine restaurants along with a thriving wine industry with a number of vineyards of note.

Because of the volcanic nature of the island there are a number of interesting sights focused on the geology. The Cueva De Los Verdes, lava-formed tunnel with guided tours. Also the Jameos del Agua, a volcanic cave system with dining & music that opens each day at 10 am.

The Cristo de La Laguna

Blessed with a near perfect climate, Tenerife has a number of good beaches like Playa de Amadores, a busy beach for swimming & sunbathing. There is also Palmitos Park, a botanic park with an aviary & dolphinarium or Siam Park a Thai-themed adventure water park.

A good location to book independent tours while in Tenerife is a tour operator called TravelOn.

The Cruise Port of Curaçao

Curaçao, Perfect Blend of Two Worlds

Wouldn’t it be great if we could move tropical seas, palm trees and great beaches to Northern Europe? It’s not going to happen, but the next best thing is to move the Netherlands into the Caribbean. Welcome to Curaçao.

Queen Juliana Bridge

There are a number of European influenced islands in the Caribbean but no place expresses it as well as this little Dutch island. While Aruba has succumbed to run-away Americanization you can still stroll the streets of Willemstad, sit in a café for a Cappuccino or stop in a small bistro for lunch and it isn’t hard to think you are in Amsterdam.  Add to that the great beaches and resorts, balmy weather and turquoise seas and you have Curacao.

Neighborhood under the Queen Juliana Bridge

Where Your Ship Docks

Willemstad is the activity center of Curacao and most ships will tie up very near the center of town. Located at the dock is a hotel area with a shopping and restaurant area. A short stroll along the water brings you to the unique Queen Emma Pontoon Bridge. On the other side of this floating bridge is the downtown area of Willemstad. There are also public facilities near the dock.

 

Transportation

Curacao is a larger island and while there are taxis available they tend to be pricey. Public transportation is sparse and difficult to make use of. If you really want to go out and see this charming island a tour or renting a car is probably your best bet.

Currency

Curacao while a major Caribbean destination and many places will accept U.S. Dollars it is usually limited to smaller purchases. The Netherlands Antillean Guilder (ANG, locally referred to as NAF, an abbreviation of the Netherlands Antillean Florin) is the official currency of Curaçao. It is benchmarked to the US dollar at a stable rate of US$ 1 = NAFl. 1.77. Most credit cards are welcome and there are ATM’s available.

Attractions

Curaçao has seen explosive growth in upscale resorts and residential neighborhoods in recent decades but the old world charm has remained intact. Over a period of time there was a huge migration of Dutch retirees, much to the consternation of the locals, and that drove up the cost of living, but it didn’t negatively impact the atmosphere of the island.

Dutch Colonial architecture

In the center of Willemstad is a channel that is part of St. Anna Bay and the primary way of getting across is the Queen Emma Pontoon Bridge. The bridge opens by breaking its connection on one side and an outboard motor pushes it out of the channel anchored by a hinge at the other end. Fun to watch and fun to ride.

On the northwest side of town is a neighborhood that has been restored and turned into a resort, visitor center and museum known as the Museum Kurá Hulanda & Sonesta Kura Hulanda Village & Spa. Where you can walk cobblestone streets and visit cafes and shops. There is also a floating market in town where boats come over from Venezuela, only 70 miles away, to sell produce (current conditions in Venezuela have probably eliminated this business). The island also boasts the Curacao Sea Aquarium and Dolphin Academy Curacao which is worth a visit.

If you like to dive, snorkel or just relax on the beach, you have come to the right place but you may have to get a ways out of Willemstad. There are dive shops everywhere and great resorts around every turn. The language is Papiamentu which is a blending of Dutch, Spanish and local Indian. Greetings are Bon dia – Good morning. Bon tardi – Good Afternoon. Bon nochi – Good Evening/Good Night and Danki – Thank you, Di nada – Your welcome.

Telephone Service At Sea

Often when people take a cruise they want to stay in touch with family back home by calling. Before you take that cruise it is advisable to check with you cellular service concerning your options and costs. Being forewarned is forearmed.

Using cell phones while on a cruise can be very expensive. The major U.S. cell services range in cost between $2.99 a minute up to $5.99. In order to provide cell service the cruise lines contract with a marine cellular service that operates while at sea. A number of the U.S. based cruise lines use Cellular At Sea for the service and the charges are passed from Cellular At Sea through to your cell service to appear on your monthly bill. Because of this arrangement most prepaid plan services just won’t work onboard ship. Using the ships in cabin service isn’t any better with $5.99 a minute being typical.

If you wait until you are in a port to place calls the service switches to the regional carriers in that country where costs are based on your cell services roaming charges. Roaming charges vary depending on your service so you’ll want to check with your carrier for those rates. If you’ve got T-Mobile, check to see if the country visited is included in the Simple Choice plan. If it is, making phone calls will only be $0.25/minute whie data is free. Calls from Mexico and Canada using T-Mobile’s Simple Choice plan are free. Verizon’s TravelPass and AT&T’s International Day Pass charge $5 to $10 per day for travelers to text, call and use data based on the plan they have at home but you must sign up for the service. Without the pass, pay-per-use data rates for both carriers costs more than $2.00/MB.

Receiving and sending text messages are usually pretty inexpensive while at sea. Typically incoming texts are free and outbound costs are typically 25¢ to 50¢. Be cautious of MMS and ask your carrier for rates as they involve data charges.

A number of years ago the major carriers had reasonably priced cruise plans but AT&T acquired Cellular At Sea and changed the rate structure. Now AT&T is the only company that currently has cruise rate packages with the lowest priced package providing 50 minutes and unlimited texts for a fixed price of $50 (overages are $1.99 a minute) with no data.

When you’re in port, your cell signal will switch to a carrier in that country where international roaming rates apply. You need to be very aware of the service switch as you enter and leave port. If you are on a call as the ship sails out and it switches to the marine service – so will the rates.

If you are looking to save money on calls, most ships have data plans with some being reasonably priced. Often you can install an app on your phone that allows calling over internet that usually works well. Services that provide video calling, like Skype may encounter internet speed issues however.

Port of Call Brunei

The Sultanate of Brunei

Brunei is a tiny nation on the island of Borneo. It’s known for the opulent Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque, adorned with chandeliers, stained glass and Italian marble, and surrounded by a lagoon. Nearby, the Royal Regalia Building showcases a gold carriage and lavish gifts presented to the sultan. To the northwest is the Jame’Asr Hassanil Bolkiah Mosque, with 29 golden domes.

Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque

The country is modern, clean and the people friendly and welcoming to visitors.

Where Your Ship Docks

The port

The Brunei seaport is Muara located 20 miles away from the capital, Bandar Seri Begawan, Most visiting cruise ships will provide shuttle busses to the capital.

 

 

 

New water-village

Transportation

Bandar Seri Begawan is a very walkable city and water taxis are easy to locate for trips and tours. While there is a good bus system, Brunei now boasts their own ride share service called Dart Brunei with apps available on on the Apple App Store and Google Play. Reports are that the system is safe and easy to use and fairly priced.

Downtown shopping mall

Currency

Brunei has its own dollar with an exchange rate of one Brunei Dollar equal to US 75¢. Major credit cards are widely accepted.

Brunei In General

The Sultan’s Palace on the hill
Bandar Seri Begawan

There has been some controversy recently involving the Sultan and “his” nations strict interpretation of Islam and Sharia Law. In Hollywood there was a call to boycott the Salton’s five luxury hotels that included The Beverly Hills Hotel. If anything this sheds a light on just how wealthy Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah is (his full name is Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah Mu’izzaddin Waddaulah ibni Al-Marhum Sultan Haji Omar Ali Saifuddien Sa’adul Khairi Waddien Sultan and Yang di-Pertuan of Brunei Darussalam).

The countries wealth is based on oil. There are huge offshore deposits controlled by the Sultan and his companies. While the Sultan controls every facet of the economy and government he is a very benevolent ruler. Currently the average income in the country is US$40,000 and most everyone that wants to work has a job. He provides free college education and government subsidized housing.

The modern outdoor market
Bandar Seri Begawan

This area of the world is famous for what are called water-villages and Brunei is home to some large water communities. A serious issue with these villages is sanitation where waste is simply flushed into the sea. To fix this problem the Sultan has been building new, modern water-villages with proper plumbing and has systematically been relocating his people into these new facilities. Generally, the people love and support their Sultan and he invests heavily to provide for his people.

 

A conversation overheard on a bus in Brunei:

  • Canadian tourist – What form of government do you have here in Brunei?
  • Local young man – We have the Sultan and the Legislative Council.
  • Canadian tourist – So the Sultan is the head of government?
  • Local young man – Yes, he takes the role of Prime Minister
  • Canadian – How often do you have elections and are there a number of political parties?
  • Local young man – Oh, we don’t have parties or elections. The Sultan appoints each member of the council.
  • Canadian tourist– Does that much power concern you? Don’t you fear corruption?
  • Local young man – No. The Sultan would remove anyone that was corrupt.
  • Canadian tourist – But don’t the people want a say in what the country does?
  • Local young man – Why? We have the Sultan. He takes very good care of us…

 

Port of Call Fredireksted, St. Croix

Visiting The Cruise Port Of Frederiksted

At 84 square miles, St. Croix is the largest island in the Virgin Island group and significantly more rural than the others. The island features a rain forest in its western interior, an arid climate in the east along with two historic towns.

The island was a possession of Denmark until the early nineteenth century and boasts a deepwater port at the west-end town of Frederiksted. The port was defended by Fort Fredirek as far back as the mid eighteenth century. A second deepwater industrial port was developed on the south coast in the nineteenth century. The island, along with St. Thomas and St. John was bought by the United States in the early nineteenth century. That means you don’t need a passport to visit and best of all you can bring back to the United States five liters of liquor duty free.

Where Your Ship Docks

The more popular destination town on St. Croix is Christiansted but it sits inside a protective coral reef with no good anchorage or pier. Cruise ships will dock on the far west end of the island at the Frederiksted pier. The island and town are developing the area around the pier and historic customs house and there are public facilities available. There is no terminal or facilities on the pier.

 

The Hotel On The Cay

Transportation

Leaving Fredireksted pier and the fort

Other than taking a tour the best way to see the island is to rent a car. Prices are reasonable but arranging a car can be an issue. On our most recent trip we had reserved a car through Avis which indicated they had an office in Frederiksted – they didn’t and we wasted an hour figuring this out and getting them to bring us a car from the airport. So be caustious in reserving a car. Driving is on the left side of the road which can be awkward because most of the vehicles come from the American market and have the steering column on the left. Taxis are available but they are expensive but you can negotiate a tour with the drivers. There is also limited bus service and “taxi buses” which have dedicated routes and a flat fare. The system is a bit freeform and isn’t something a visitor can rely on.

Lunch on the water in Christiansted

Currency

The U.S. Virgin Islands use the U.S. Dollar but credit cards and debit cards are welcome.

Attractions

Frederiksted is a town that seems to always be redeveloping starting tomorrow. For decades it has been taking two steps forward and one step backwards – sometime three steps backward. It is a historic town with a colonial fortification and customs house. There is a small strip of beach in town but the nearest good beach is Sandy Point National Wildlife Refuge. Unfortunately(?), to protect the sea turtle nests the beach is closed between April and September.

Historic Christiansted

As mentioned already, to really see the island you should rent a car. Christiansted is about twenty five miles from Frederiksted and there are some glorious beaches scattered around St. Croix. Christiansted to us, represents the quintessential tropical waterfront. It is located on the north central coast. The waterfront is fringed with a boardwalk and small boat docks, protected by a natural reef and a close-in small island occupied by a hotel. The harbor features sailboats at anchor, crystal clear water and a number of small hotels and restaurants along the boardwalk. Running up from the waterfront is a colonial era town where the stone and brick buildings include colonnades protecting the sidewalks from the frequent tropical rainstorms. Most of these buildings feature galleries, shops and restaurants along with a couple of small hotels. Just to the east on the waterfront is the old Fort Christiansvaern operated by the U.S. Park Service. The small island in the harbor is Protestant Cay and features the Hotel on the Cay which is serviced by hotel launches. Its beaches are open to the public but there is a small fee to take the launch from town.

Another area, which we love for its beaches and good snorkeling is Davis Bay. Located along the western north coast it has always been pretty isolated and primitive but the beaches are some of the best on the island. Some thirty years ago the Rock Resort people built an exclusive resort above Davis Bay called the Carambola Resort but a combination of things, including a storm named Hugo, caused the venture to fail. Today it is alive again as the exclusive Renaissance St. Croix Carambola Resort and, based on location alone, it is worth visiting.

Fort Christiansvaern

Up in the rain forest is a bar with a pig and back in day you were expected to buy the pig a beer by simply tossing a can into the pen. The pig would pick up the can, raise its head, crush the can and drink. If you got there too late (or early depending on perspective), the pig was passed out drunk. I never actually knew the places name but apparently it is the Montpellier Domino Club and I would bet that that pig is long gone. It has been replaced we’re told by a couple of pigs and now seems to be a “must do” tourist destination.

If you are a skin or scuba diver, or just a novice swimmer, one real “must do” on St. Croix is to visit the underwater National Park at Buck Island where the whole island, not just the reef, is the park. Located 1.5 miles off the northeast coast, there are a number of boat tours from Christiansted out to the area and the reef is spectacular. There is also an underwater trail on the eastern tip. If you can convince yourself to take this trip and put on a face mask you will never forget it.

A good driving circuit is to drive out Centerline Road where you should visit the Estate Whim Museum, the only surviving plantation great house in the Virgin Islands. Go on into Christiansted for lunch and a walk around the historic district and the waterfront. Skirt along the northwest coast from Salt River a stop at Davis Bay, the scenery is spectacular. On your return to Frederiksted drive through the rain forest on Mahogany Road with a stop off for a beer with the pig if you are so inclined.

Port of Call Lisbon Portugal

It’s easy while walking the streets of Lisbon to think you have somehow slipped back in time. The port of call of Lisbon really seems to live in the past. Quant cobblestoned streets lead to plazas bordered by palaces, churches and castles. Attractive small cafes and restaurants abound and shops and galleries invite at every turn. Streetcars that look like they really belong in another time, glide down narrow streets. Even much of this cities graffiti rises to the level of fine art. Portugal seems to have deliberately let the world speed on by, having discovered a comfortable place to sit back and watch everyone else frantically race on to – not sure where.

Where Your Ship Docks

There is a stretch along Lisbon’s central waterfront where cruise ships dock. There are two terminals not far apart, Terminal de Cruzeiros de Lisboa and Terminal de Cruzeiros de Santa Apolonia. Both feature good access to ships and town and have free public facilities. Much of central Lisbon is within a mile of the cruise piers.

Transportation

Lisbon features a good public transport network, both underground and surface with buses and trams and can also add the Transtejo (river connection). Lisbon Metro is one of the most cost efficient and flexible ways of traveling around the city.

There are 24 and 48 hour passes available and the funicular system can also be used.

 

1 Day ticket (24h)

Carris/Metro 6.40€ -Valid for unlimited journeys on Carris and Metro, networks during 24 hours following the first validation.

Carris/Metro/Transtejo (Cacilhas) 9.50€ – Valid for unlimited journeys on Carris, Metro and Transtejo (river connection), during 24 hours following the first validation.

Ticket Offices are open every day 7:45 a.m – 7:45 p.m at the following Metro stations:

Marquês de Pombal, Campo Grande, Colégio Militar/Lu, Jardim Zoológico, Marquês de Pombal

Rossio, Baixa-Chiado, Cais do Sodré, Oriente Aeroporto. There are also vending machines at every station.

There is also a visitor’s card called the Lisboa Card where you get unlimited travel for 24 hours for just €20 that also includes free access to Lisbon’s best museums and attractions like the Torre de Belem, Jeronimos Monastery and the Santa Justa Elevator and more. You can buy the card online HERE.

Currency

The currency of Portugal is the Euro and major credit cards are welcome almost everywhere.

Attractions

Castles, museums, churches and palaces all within a mile or so from the cruise ship.

Castelo de S. Jorge at R. de Santa Cruz do Castelo

Hilltop Moorish castle & palace ruins

Jerónimos Monastery at Praça do Império 1400-206 Lisboa

World heritage listed Gothic monastery

Oceanário de Lisboa at Esplanada Dom Carlos I

Waterside aquarium with ocean ecosystems

Museu Nacional do Azulejo at R. Me. Deus 4

Ceramic collections located in a church

Belém Tower at Tower at Av. Brasília

Medieval defensive tower

Padrão dos Descobrimentos at Av. Brasília

Concrete monument to maritime explorers

Santa Justa Lift at R. do Ouro

Elevator linking city levels from 1902

Carmo Convent at Largo do Carmo

Medieval ruins & archaeology museum

Basílica da Estrela at Praça da Estrela

Baroque church with twin bell towers

Ajuda National Palace at Largo Ajuda 1349-021

19th-century royal palace and museum

Arco da Rua Augusta at R. Augusta 2

Triumphal arch with a viewing platform

Miradouro da Nossa Senhora do Monte

Popular destination for city views

Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga at R. das Janelas Verdes

Historical art collection in old palace

Palácio dos Marqueses da Fronteira at Largo São Domingos de Benfica 1

Grand palace

Miradouro Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen at Calçada da Graça

Terrace park featuring sweeping city views

Museu de Marinhaat Praça do Império

Maritime museum in sixteenth century monastery