Port of Call Ketchikan

 

The town gets its name from the Tongass and Tlingit Indians who named their fish camp kitschk-hin, meaning stream with “thundering wings of eagles.” While Skagway attracted gold prospectors, Ketchikan was a treasure trove of abundant fish and timber that attracted Americans to the area. In 1885, Mike Martin bought 160 acres from Chief Kyan to found the township. The first cannery was built in 1886 near the mouth of Ketchikan Creek and by 1912 four more were in operation.

By 1936 there were seven canneries in working, producing almost two million cases of salmon a season. The need for lumber fostered the Ketchikan Spruce Mills built in 1903, which operated for over 70 years. The lumber industry collapsed when the Clinton administration moved to reduce timber cutting in Alaska by having the U.S. Forest service cancel contracts for timber in March 1997.

Where Your Ship Docks

Getting from your ship into town is convenient as there are several piers near downtown for berthing cruise ships.

Transportation

Ketchikan is a small town with the central district encompassing only a few dozen blocks. Most trips out of town involve specific nature tours by bus, car, boat or plane. The town is located on one of Alaska’s large coastal islands with most of it covered in large tracts of undeveloped forest.

Currency

Ketchikan is an American town and uses the U.S. Dollar. Credit cards are widely accepted and so are ATM machines.

Attractions

Ketchikan is home to Tongass Historical Museum along with a waterfront cannery exhibit and the Great Alaskan Lumberjack Show. Salmon fishing charters are readily available and you can have your catch flash frozen or smoked and couriered home (a bit pricey but worth the bragging rights). Additional tours include wilderness expeditions, trips to the Misty Fjords and whale watching.

Shopping offers a number of opportunities with the smoked and canned salmon being high on everyone’s list being a reasonably priced prize.

 

 

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Port of Call Amsterdam

Amsterdam, Heart of The Netherlands

Approaching The Netherlands from the North Sea cruise ships navigate the North Sea Canal. The canal runs from the IJmuiden locks to the Coenhaven. East of the Coenhaven, the waterway is called the River IJ (both letters are capitalized) and continues up to the Oranjesluizen locks located in the eastern part of Amsterdam. Than from the Oranjesluizen up to the Passenger Terminal in Amsterdam. Unfortunately ships that are transiting into Amsterdam often come in before dawn so as to be tied up early in the day. Passengers that are sailing out of Amsterdam late in the day get a much better appreciation of the systems that protect Holland from the North Sea.

Amsterdam is the largest city in the Netherlands famous for tulips, cheese, marijuana, red light districts and canals,. Many people call the country Holland but the true name is the Netherlands with Holland being the name of two of its states. The people are Dutch as is the name of their language.

The most important thing to know about Amsterdam is when walking in the city, pay attention and stay out of the bike lanes and watch out for bikes! Everyone rides bikes to get around in this city and in most areas there is a designated bike lane between the sidewalks and the street. The biggest mistake visitors make is seeing the traffic stop and step off the sidewalk without looking for bicycles. Keep you eyes open for bikes – a bicyclist moving at ten miles an hour can do a lot of damage to a pedestrian.

Where Your Ship Docks

Your ship will dock at the Cruise Terminal on the river IJ. The cruise facilities are modern with good access to public facilities. From the terminal it is just a 10-minute walk to the central train station. With the cruise ship at your back walk off to your right along the waterfront to reach the station and central Amsterdam.

Transportation

The cruise terminal is only a 20 minute ride from Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport and just a ten minute walk to Amsterdam Central Train station. There is also frequent train service from the station to Schiphol Airport. Amsterdam has an excellent and inexpensive bus system

The city is laid out like a fan with major streets radiating out from the Amsterdam Central Train station. The major canals arc across the fan along with a number of city streets. Most major streets are serviced by trams which run every few minutes.

Traveling within Amsterdam by public transportion is easy to understand and very convenient. The network is operated by GVB throughout the central city and connects its neighborhoods with trains, trams, metro, bus and ferry. The least expensive and most convenient way to see the city is with GVB day passes. Available from 1 to 7 days, with prices starting from €8.50 per person, per day and valid on trams, buses and metros operated throughout Amsterdam. You can buy your tickets in advance from the GVB website HERE.

Currency

The Netherlands, like other members of the EU uses the euro as its official currency. You will often discover that to avoid the use of the 1 and 2 cent coins, many cash transactions are rounded to the nearest five cents in the Netherlands. Credit and debit cards a commonly accepted but U.S. Dollars need to be changed into Euros.

Attractions

Anne Frank Museum

This is a beautiful city and great for walking (watch out for the bicycles!). Canals lined with boats are at every turn and like most major cities there are books dedicated to seeing this city. Museums, galleries, gardens and historic places are everywhere but often it’s just the cities neighborhoods that make a visit memorable.

Rijksmuseum – One of Amsterdam’s most popular attractions – and certainly its most important art repository – the Rijksmuseum was founded in 1809 to house the country’s huge collection of rare art and antiquities.

Van Gogh Museum – A must-visit for art fans and historians, the spectacular Van Gogh Museum has been one of Amsterdam’s top attractions since it opened in 1972.

Vondelpark – The largest and most visited park in Amsterdam, Vondelpark occupies 116 acres.

Keukenhof

The Anne Frank House – On the Prinsengracht, the Anne Frank Museum is dedicated to the all-too-short life of one of the world’s best-known Holocaust victims.

If you are visiting in the Spring (between 21 March to 10 May, 2020) a must see is the Keukenhof Gardens, one of the worlds largest flower festivals featuring acres of tulips. Visit our article on the Keukenhof  HERE.

 

Civitavecchia – Port of Call Rome

Introduction

The Cruise Port of Civitavecchia is a seaside city and the port serving the city of Rome. The city is served by frequent train service from and to Rome along with regular service to other Italian destinations. The Cruise port is only a short five or six block walk from the train station along the waterfront on Via Aurelia. Once at the port there are usually free shuttles to the cruise ships. From where and how the shuttles run seems to change often.

Civitavecchia

The main gate to the port is next to Forte Michelangelo and the nearest to the train station and across the street from the McDonalds. Recently the cruise shuttles are being organized nearer the Roman Dock entrance about 5 blocks farther up Via Dalmazia from the main gate.

Rome Cruise Port Civitavecchia is both a cruise ship embarkation port as well as a popular port of call and for that reason it can have a large number of ships in port at times. On one day we counted seven large cruise ships tied up along the sea wall and piers. Because it is a working port and its size the port normally requires a shuttle to get out of the port or to your ship.

Where Your Ship Docks

In Civitavecchia port

The seaport stretches along the waterfront in downtown Civitavecchia and there are no cruise terminals or public facilities. Walking out is usually not permitted because it is a large working port but usually there are free shuttle buses to one of two gates. The city near the the port has a nice stretch along the sea toward the train station featuring a number of outdoor cafes. There are a number of nice shops in the colonnade strip behind the port and a walking mall just two blocks up from the McDonalds at the seaport.

Transportation

Civitavecchia Station

When you are cruising out of Rome, Italy the distance to the port requires you to do some planning. If you are arriving at Fiumicino, Leonardo da Vinci airport specifically to get to your cruise ship you can save a lot of money by taking a train. The airport train station is inside the airport and a ticket to Civitavecchia is around €5 (* see note below). It does require taking a local train and switching trains at Trastevere station. Taking a taxi to the port can be an expensive trip with fares running from €150 to €300. If your not inclined to go the train option most cruise lines will offer transfer services to and from Rome airport at an additional fee. When booking your cruise usually transfers are provided as an option.

The Forum in Rome

While most cruises offer tours into Rome with some being nothing more than round trip bus service the fare can run $80 or more per person. If your cruise is ending in Civitavecchia or if it is a stop on your cruise itinerary the best way to get into Rome is to take a train. It’s only a short six to ten block walk up Via Aurelia to the station. Trains run as frequently as ever 20 to 30 minutes. From Civitavecchia a typical trip to S. Pietro (Vatican City) takes 40 minutes, Trastevere 50 minutes, Ostiense 55 minutes and finally Termini (the central train station) 70 minutes. Fare starts at €5 one way on the commuter trains but can cost up to €25 round trip if using regional trains depending on ticket class. There is a manned ticket booth at the station along with vending machines. We would strongly recommend getting a metro train map ahead of time and plan your route before getting to Italy. Our experience is that buying tickets ahead of time online doesn’t save anything and can actually cost you much more.

In Civitavecchia taxis are available but are famous for overcharging with the short ride from the port to the train station (6 to 10 blocks) quoted as high as €10 or €15. Taking a taxi into Rome or to the airport can be an expensive trip with fares running from €150 to €300.There are also shuttle services to the airport with an average price starting at €25 per person. It is recommended that reservations be made ahead of time as schedules can vary a lot.

Currency

The local currency is the Euro and the U.S. Dollar is generally not accepted. Most most major credit cards are accepted and an easy way to exchange money is to use an ATM machine if you have a debit card.

 

Civitavecchia’s walking mall

Around Civitavecchia

We have stayed overnight in Civitavecchia a number of times. It is a pleasant city with a number of nice hotels and restaurants within walking distance of the port. One happens to be our favorite pizza parlor (HERE). The main business district is next to the port and there are a number of nice shops in the area as well as a pedestrian mall. Via Aurelia runs along the waterfront from the train station to the ports main entrance and has a number of restaurants, most with outdoor seating available. There is also a nice park area along the water which is a popular place for locals to stroll in the evening.

Civitavecchia

Forte Michelangelo is a historic monument erected as a fortress in the 16th century that runs along the waterfront behind the port. In the day time there is a central courtyard open to the public and on the street side it features a colonnade and also offers panoramic port and ocean views.

Terme Taurine, also known as the Taurine Baths, is an archaeological site of a Roman bathhouse complex outside of Civitavecchia. The site features ruins dating to the Republican and Imperial eras with the oldest structures dating to the first century BC.

The National Archaeological Museum Of Civitavecchia, also known as City Museum, is located inside the eighteenth-century building commissioned by Pope Clement XIII in the eighteenth century, a block away from Fort Michelangelo. It features exhibits from the dawn of civilization, during the whole Roman times, up to the Middle Ages.

*Please Note: If you are taking a train during morning or evening rush hour many of the local trains are commuter trains and if you are traveling with suitcases the Italians may get upset with taking up extra seats. Put your bags overhead or at a car entrance.

Port of Call Tenerife

Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands

West of southern Morocco in the Atlantic Ocean sits a cluster of volcanic islands called The Canaries. The Canary Islands feature a rugged volcanic landscape known for the black and white sand beaches. Tenerife, the largest island, is dominated by an active volcano Mt. Teide, which has its own astronomical observatory and is part of Teide National Park. Tenerife hosts a huge pre-Lent Carnival each year in the capital of Santa Cruz de Tenerife.

Santa Cruz de Tenerife

Where Your Ship Docks

Most cruise ships will dock at the piers in Santa Cruz de Tenerife. There are no cruise terminals or readily available public facilities at the pier. While docked in the city it is still a good walk to reach the central business district. At times there can be shuttles available to get out of the port area.

Transportation

The island does have a good bus system (CLICK HERE) that uses a pass card, the Ten+ Travel Card. It can be used on most all bus routes. The plastic card itself can be purchased at various outlets around the island for €2 plus a €5 minimum charge amount. The island of Tenerife is  large covering almost 100 square miles with a trip from one end to the other being about fifty miles.

Because of the distances that you need to cover to see the island on a short visit it’s recommended that you rent a car or take a tour.

Currency

The Canary Islands, like Spain are part of the EU making the local currency the Euro. Credit cards are widely accepted but you will need to use the Euro for cash transactions.

Attractions

The Canary Islands are a favorite holiday destination for Europeans, particularly the British. It features a good selection of fine restaurants along with a thriving wine industry with a number of vineyards of note.

Because of the volcanic nature of the island there are a number of interesting sights focused on the geology. The Cueva De Los Verdes, lava-formed tunnel with guided tours. Also the Jameos del Agua, a volcanic cave system with dining & music that opens each day at 10 am.

The Cristo de La Laguna

Blessed with a near perfect climate, Tenerife has a number of good beaches like Playa de Amadores, a busy beach for swimming & sunbathing. There is also Palmitos Park, a botanic park with an aviary & dolphinarium or Siam Park a Thai-themed adventure water park.

A good location to book independent tours while in Tenerife is a tour operator called TravelOn.

The Cruise Port of Curaçao

Curaçao, Perfect Blend of Two Worlds

Wouldn’t it be great if we could move tropical seas, palm trees and great beaches to Northern Europe? It’s not going to happen, but the next best thing is to move the Netherlands into the Caribbean. Welcome to Curaçao.

Queen Juliana Bridge

There are a number of European influenced islands in the Caribbean but no place expresses it as well as this little Dutch island. While Aruba has succumbed to run-away Americanization you can still stroll the streets of Willemstad, sit in a café for a Cappuccino or stop in a small bistro for lunch and it isn’t hard to think you are in Amsterdam.  Add to that the great beaches and resorts, balmy weather and turquoise seas and you have Curacao.

Neighborhood under the Queen Juliana Bridge

Where Your Ship Docks

Willemstad is the activity center of Curacao and most ships will tie up very near the center of town. Located at the dock is a hotel area with a shopping and restaurant area. A short stroll along the water brings you to the unique Queen Emma Pontoon Bridge. On the other side of this floating bridge is the downtown area of Willemstad. There are also public facilities near the dock.

 

Transportation

Curacao is a larger island and while there are taxis available they tend to be pricey. Public transportation is sparse and difficult to make use of. If you really want to go out and see this charming island a tour or renting a car is probably your best bet.

Currency

Curacao while a major Caribbean destination and many places will accept U.S. Dollars it is usually limited to smaller purchases. The Netherlands Antillean Guilder (ANG, locally referred to as NAF, an abbreviation of the Netherlands Antillean Florin) is the official currency of Curaçao. It is benchmarked to the US dollar at a stable rate of US$ 1 = NAFl. 1.77. Most credit cards are welcome and there are ATM’s available.

Attractions

Curaçao has seen explosive growth in upscale resorts and residential neighborhoods in recent decades but the old world charm has remained intact. Over a period of time there was a huge migration of Dutch retirees, much to the consternation of the locals, and that drove up the cost of living, but it didn’t negatively impact the atmosphere of the island.

Dutch Colonial architecture

In the center of Willemstad is a channel that is part of St. Anna Bay and the primary way of getting across is the Queen Emma Pontoon Bridge. The bridge opens by breaking its connection on one side and an outboard motor pushes it out of the channel anchored by a hinge at the other end. Fun to watch and fun to ride.

On the northwest side of town is a neighborhood that has been restored and turned into a resort, visitor center and museum known as the Museum Kurá Hulanda & Sonesta Kura Hulanda Village & Spa. Where you can walk cobblestone streets and visit cafes and shops. There is also a floating market in town where boats come over from Venezuela, only 70 miles away, to sell produce (current conditions in Venezuela have probably eliminated this business). The island also boasts the Curacao Sea Aquarium and Dolphin Academy Curacao which is worth a visit.

If you like to dive, snorkel or just relax on the beach, you have come to the right place but you may have to get a ways out of Willemstad. There are dive shops everywhere and great resorts around every turn. The language is Papiamentu which is a blending of Dutch, Spanish and local Indian. Greetings are Bon dia – Good morning. Bon tardi – Good Afternoon. Bon nochi – Good Evening/Good Night and Danki – Thank you, Di nada – Your welcome.

Port of Call Brunei

The Sultanate of Brunei

Brunei is a tiny nation on the island of Borneo. It’s known for the opulent Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque, adorned with chandeliers, stained glass and Italian marble, and surrounded by a lagoon. Nearby, the Royal Regalia Building showcases a gold carriage and lavish gifts presented to the sultan. To the northwest is the Jame’Asr Hassanil Bolkiah Mosque, with 29 golden domes.

Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque

The country is modern, clean and the people friendly and welcoming to visitors.

Where Your Ship Docks

The port

The Brunei seaport is Muara located 20 miles away from the capital, Bandar Seri Begawan, Most visiting cruise ships will provide shuttle busses to the capital.

 

 

 

New water-village

Transportation

Bandar Seri Begawan is a very walkable city and water taxis are easy to locate for trips and tours. While there is a good bus system, Brunei now boasts their own ride share service called Dart Brunei with apps available on on the Apple App Store and Google Play. Reports are that the system is safe and easy to use and fairly priced.

Downtown shopping mall

Currency

Brunei has its own dollar with an exchange rate of one Brunei Dollar equal to US 75¢. Major credit cards are widely accepted.

Brunei In General

The Sultan’s Palace on the hill

Bandar Seri Begawan

There has been some controversy recently involving the Sultan and “his” nations strict interpretation of Islam and Sharia Law. In Hollywood there was a call to boycott the Salton’s five luxury hotels that included The Beverly Hills Hotel. If anything this sheds a light on just how wealthy Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah is (his full name is Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah Mu’izzaddin Waddaulah ibni Al-Marhum Sultan Haji Omar Ali Saifuddien Sa’adul Khairi Waddien Sultan and Yang di-Pertuan of Brunei Darussalam).

The countries wealth is based on oil. There are huge offshore deposits controlled by the Sultan and his companies. While the Sultan controls every facet of the economy and government he is a very benevolent ruler. Currently the average income in the country is US$40,000 and most everyone that wants to work has a job. He provides free college education and government subsidized housing.

The modern outdoor market

Bandar Seri Begawan

This area of the world is famous for what are called water-villages and Brunei is home to some large water communities. A serious issue with these villages is sanitation where waste is simply flushed into the sea. To fix this problem the Sultan has been building new, modern water-villages with proper plumbing and has systematically been relocating his people into these new facilities. Generally, the people love and support their Sultan and he invests heavily to provide for his people.

 

A conversation overheard on a bus in Brunei:

  • Canadian tourist – What form of government do you have here in Brunei?
  • Local young man – We have the Sultan and the Legislative Council.
  • Canadian tourist – So the Sultan is the head of government?
  • Local young man – Yes, he takes the role of Prime Minister
  • Canadian – How often do you have elections and are there a number of political parties?
  • Local young man – Oh, we don’t have parties or elections. The Sultan appoints each member of the council.
  • Canadian tourist– Does that much power concern you? Don’t you fear corruption?
  • Local young man – No. The Sultan would remove anyone that was corrupt.
  • Canadian tourist – But don’t the people want a say in what the country does?
  • Local young man – Why? We have the Sultan. He takes very good care of us…

 

Port of Call Nha Trang, Vietnam

Nha Trang, Vietnams Resort City

Nha Trang is a major Vietnamese resort area famous for beautiful beaches and a growing entertainment venue. It is Vietnam’s most popular coastal town that has benefitted from its proximity to a number of beautiful beaches. Directly across the water from downtown is Tre Island that boasts an amusement park and some additional nice beaches. The area’s beaches attract people from all over the world and seems particularly popular with Russian tourists.

Where Your Ship Docks

Nha Trang is a tender port with a landing location south of the city at the port area. The pier does have public facilities nearby and when ships are visiting a market is set-up in the port selling t-shirts, crafts and souvenirs. Hint – when buying t-shirts it’s a good idea to buy a couple of sizes larger than your used to.

 

Cruise ship at anchor off Nha Trang

Transportation

Vendors at the port

In the city of Nha Trang there is one of the worlds largest cablecar systems connecting to Tre island across three miles of water to Vinpearl Amusement Park. The most convenient way to get around is by taxi where most drivers speak English. The trip from the port into the tourist center of town is about five miles and should cost about five US Dollars. The city of Nha Trang is a good walking town as a number tourist attractions, popular restaurants, bars and nightclubs, and shopping are within walking distances in the center of town.

Vinpearl Amusement Park

Approaching the port of Nha Trang

If you’re more adventures Nha Trang also has a bus system with six routes. This is another good way to get around with fares being no more than 5000 Dong. The buses are air-conditioned and comfortable. Through the tourist area of Nha Trang are two popular routes, the No. 2 and No. 4 that cross near the center of town.

 

Currency

Excursion poster

The local currency is the Vietnamese Dong that runs between 20,000 and 25,000 to 1 US$. Also the U.S. Dollar is welcome, actually almost preferred almost, everywhere at good exchange rates as are most major credit cards

Attractions

The major attraction are the beaches. The largest resort beach area is along the coast ten miles south of the port toward the town of Biển Đông, but there are good beaches north of town and over on Tre Island.

 

Po Nagar temple

Nha Trang also has a number of cultural sites including the Long Sơn Pagoda a Buddhist temple in the city. It is regarded as one of the main attractions in the city, along with the Hai Duc Temple. There is also Po Nagar, a Cham temple tower built sometime before 781 AD and located in the medieval principality of Kauthara, near Nha Trang. It is dedicated to Yan Po Nagar, the goddess of the country, who came to be identified with the Hindu goddess Bhagavati.

The area also has a number of highly rated skin diving and scuba sights. As an interesting note the waters around Nha Trang support a thriving seahorse collection industry much to the objection of the UN and wildlife protection groups.