Mount Rushmore and Crazy Horse

People love statues from high art like Michelangelo’s David to ancient wonders like the Sphinx in Egypt that measures 66 feet standing above the desert floor. Or Christ the Redeemer in Rio standing high above the city at 2,453 feet above sea level. It seems if you are looking to really get noticed go BIG. That was actually the original idea for Mount Rushmore, intending it to be a tourist attraction.

It seems to have become a success. Tourism is South Dakota’s second-largest industry, and Mount Rushmore is the state’s top tourist attraction with over 2 million people visiting the park each year.

We visited these monuments at the beginning of our trip across Yellowstone and the parks of Utah and while these were not on our “must do” list we are glad we took the time to visit. Mt. Rushmore is an impressive sight, the museum is informative and the hiking trails range through some beautiful terrain.

If you take the time to visit Mt. Rushmore take a few extra hours to visit Crazy Horse. It is an inspiration to see what people can aspire to create.

Mount Rushmore National Memorial is centered around a sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills in Keystone, South Dakota by sculptor Gutzon Borglum. It was carved from 1927 to 1941 with the help of his son Lincoln Borglum and chief carver of the mountain Luigi del Bianco. The sculptures feature the 60-foot heads of Presidents George Washington (1732–1799), Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919), and Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865). The park covers 1,278 acres and is 5,725 feet above sea level. The National Park Service took Mount Rushmore under its jurisdiction in 1933.

 

Crazy Horse Monument

Not far from Mount Rushmore work is progressing on what will eventually be the worlds largest sculpture. The Crazy Horse Monument, referred to as The Eighth Wonder of the World in progress. It will depict the Oglala Lakota warrior, Crazy Horse, riding a horse and pointing into the distance toward the lands of his ancestors. The memorial was commissioned by Henry Standing Bear, a Lakota elder, to be sculpted by Korczak Ziolkowski (who also worked on Rushmore). It is operated by the Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation, a nonprofit organization. The monument has been in progress since 1948 and is still being worked by the Ziolkowski family. It is far from completion.

 

 

A model of the sculpture with the mountain in the background.

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