Getting Around In Rome (Part 2)

Using Rome Public Transit

The Rome public transportation system is an integrated network of fast rail (Metro), trams, regional trains and buses that serve Rome and outlying suburbs.

The Metro is the easiest to figure out and the fastest way to get around Rome. It consists of three lines, the A, that runs east west, the B that runs north south and a spur of B known as the B1.

Rome bus routes run everywhere but maps are difficult to come by and figure out. There are three (maybe as budget cuts keep changing these) electric bus routes (115, 116,117) that run around central Rome that will get you to a number of attractions.

The regional rail system connects the outlying areas including the airports and the seaport of Civitavecchia.

Ticket options are:
  • B.I.T. standard ticket, valid for one Metro ride or 100 minutes on all buses allowing transfers. €1.50
  • 24 hour ticket – valid for unlimited metro, bus, and train travel within Rome for 24 hours from validation. €7.00
  • 48 hour ticket – valid for unlimited metro, bus, and train travel within Rome for 48 hours from validation. €12.50
  • 72 hour ticket – valid for unlimited metro, bus, and train travel within Rome for 72 hours from validation. €18.00
  • C.I.S. €24.00. Weekly ticket – valid for 7 calendar days

Note: Public transportation is free for children under 10 years old.

Using Tickets

The system features a card ticket that can be purchased at vending machines in any metro station, convenience stores or newsagents.. To get into the Metro, you have to insert the ticket into a turnstile and recover it. On buses and trams, you just get on board and be prepared to show it to a ticket inspector on request. To first use a ticket for a bus or tram you must validate the ticket by time-stamping it in a machine located on the bus or tram.

What’s not covered for the visitor by Rome public transport tickets:

  • The Leonardo Express train running non-stop between Fiumicino Airport and Rome’s Termini Station.
  • Any airport bus or train to either of Rome’s two airports, Fiumicino or Ciampino.
  • The trains to and from Rome’s cruise port, Civitavecchia.

The Roma Pass

The Roma Pass is the “official” tourist sightseeing pass for the City of Rome (but not Vatican City) and is offered by the the City of Rome authorities themselves who own or manage most of the sights and museums you will want to see in the City of Rome.

You can get them at the official tourist offices in Rome including at Termini Railway Station, or you can conveniently buy them in advance on-line.

A 72 hour pass is Euro 38.50

A 24 hour pass is Euro 28.00

The Roma Pass has 4 main components:

  • Free entry to the first 2 visited museums and / or archaeological sites of your choice.
  • Concessionary tickets to all other museums and / or archaeological sites visited after
  • Free use of the city’s public transport network for 3 days.
  • A Rome city map

There is a 48 hour version that offers the same as the 3 day version, but only allows free entry to the first attraction and 2 days travel on Rome public transport.

Hop-on Hop-off Buses

Rome’s hop-on hop-off sightseeing buses.

One Day Hop-On, Hop-off Ticket (€28 per person)

Stops include the Colloseum, Circus Maximus, the Roman Forum, the Pantheon, and six more stops.

The hop-on, hop-off bus departs from 2 terminals and includes 10 stops covering all of the city’s major attractions

3-In-1 Saver Ticket (€80 per person)

Enjoy 48-hour hop-on hop-off bus sightseeing tour that covers city’s major attractions

Skip The Line to the Colosseum and the Vatican Museum

Onboard audio commentary in 8 languages is included

Free WiFi on all the buses

Clicking on maps will link to high resolution maps.

Rome public bus routes
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